Facts about waves and the unexplored deep oceans

main_web1-800x600If you have ever been to a beach, you would’ve surely loved the feeling of the waves hitting your feet. Pretty soothing, isn’t it ? Let me ask you a simple question, What do you think a wave is? Is it the water travelling?

To your surprise, No! water doesn’t travel along with a wave. It is the energy that moves in a wave. Due to this energy, water particles simply shift up and down in small circular paths called orbits. In most cases, this energy comes from wind. Waves in the ocean keep on mixing the water up to a depth of 328.1 feet (100m) in this way.

Have you ever wondered what lies beyond the horizon of the huge ocean that you see?

The average ocean depth is 12,179 feet (3,700 m). 500,000 to 100 million living things are estimated to be in the wide oceans that cover more than 70% of the planet Earth. Oceans are one of the least explored regions. The instruments to learn about them, like deep-sea camera, deep manned submersibles came into existence only 40-50 years ago.

On the basis of depth, there are 5 zones defined in the ocean.

  1. Epipelagic Zone ( 0 – 200 m )
  2. Mesopelagic Zone ( 200 – 1,000 m )
  3. Bathypelagic Zone ( 1,000 – 4,000 m )
  4. Abyssopelagic Zone ( 4,000 – 6,000 m )
  5. Hadopelagic Zone ( more than 6,000 m )

The Epipelagic zone receives enough sunlight for photosynthesis to occur. The Mesopelagic zone gets only diffused light and is also known as the twilight zone. Below this zone, no sunlight penetrates. It is pitch dark, due to which such depths of oceans and their organisms are difficult to be learned about.

 

 

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